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ISSUE 60, OCTOBER 2015

ASK A LAWYER:

Return toWork

Programs

Q:

My insurance company forced me to return to

work even though I am disabled. I am struggling and

cannot continue working. Do I have to submit a new

claim?

A:

The question of whether a new claim must be

submitted if you cannot continue will usually depend

on the “Recurrent Disability” provision in the policy,

or the clause in the policy that deals with the impact

an attempt at returning to work will have on future

entitlement in the event that ther return attempt

fails. You should carefully review the policy terms

in your specific case to see how this works in your

particular circumstances.

Q:

My employer did not try to accommodate me at

all. What should I do?

A:

If you and your health care providers believe

you are ready to return to work, but you require

accommodation, such as modified work duties, hours

or modification of your workspace, your employer

is required to provide reasonable accommodation

in accordance with various laws. If your employer

refuses to accommodate your reasonable requests,

you could consider filing a human rights complaint

or taking legal action, for which you should consult

an employment lawyer, who may be able to assist.

DID YOU KNOW?

Did you know that more than

three million Canadians have been

diagnosed with diabetes?

There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1

diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and

adolescents. It occurs when the pancreas is unable

to produce insulin. Approximately 10% of people

with diabetes have Type 1. The remaining 90% have

Type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the pancreas

does not produce enough insulin or when the body

does not effectively use the insulin that is produced.

Type 2 usually occurs in adulthood, although more

and more children in high-risk population are being

diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

If left untreated or improperly managed, diabetes

can result in a variety of complications, such as:

Heart disease

Kidney disease

Eye disease

Impotence

Nerve damage

The first step in preventing or delaying the onset

of these complications is recognizing the risk

factors, as well as signs and symptoms of diabetes.

For information about the signs and symptoms of

diabetes, and diabetes resources, please visit the

Canadian Diabetes Association.

SP

Diabetes Facts

Always #AskALawyer if you have disibility law questions!

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