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Why Should I Stop Working and Apply For Disability Benefits?

Why Should I Stop Working and Apply For Disability Benefits?

Working And Disability Benefits

There are many reasons why you should consider applying for disability benefits rather than reducing your working hours. Here are the most important reasons:
  • Your Health Comes First
If working with your disability has become so difficult that you are considering applying for disability benefits – you shouldn’t second guess yourself. Your health should be your number one priority, and if you are suffering on the job you need to take a break from work. This can be either long term or short term. There are many advantages to taking the time off that you need – from healing an injury, to being free to seek proper medical care, to stress reduction. This is especially true if you have a physical job. Adding strain to a bad situation can be very detrimental to your health and make your condition worse.
  • If You Go Part Time, Your Benefits Could Reduce
Many people don’t realize that reducing their working hours can result in a reduction of the benefits they are eligible for. If you choose to reduce your hours, you may only be eligible for benefits for part-time hours instead of the full-time hours you once worked. This is very risky – if you find yourself in a worse position down the line (where you are unable to continue with your reduced workload) the benefits you can receive will be for the smaller number of working hours, rather than the full-time hours you formerly worked. The reduced benefit entitlement may not be sufficient to cover your costs of living, medications, and treatments when you need them the most.
  • If You Go Part Time You May Lose Your Benefits Altogether
Before you take the plunge and reduce your working hours due to a disability, you should read your insurance policy carefully. Some group disability benefits plans may exclude you once you reduce your hours below a certain number per week. This means that if you find yourself unable to perform your reduced workload in the future you may no longer be eligible to receive any disability benefits at all.
  • If You Stay at Work you Risk Being Fired
Unfortunately, even if you push yourself to the limits in order to stay at work you may not be doing yourself or your company any favours. You risk injuring yourself further, or delaying recovery of your debilitating illness. If you ask yourself honestly whether you are doing your job to the best of your ability, you will probably say no. This opens up the possibility that your employer has noticed that you are not doing your best work and that you are not contributing to the company like you were before. The employer may choose to terminate your employment for cause (which means you cannot sue for wrongful dismissal) if you are not doing your job properly.

The bottom line is if you are disabled or seriously ill and have access to disability benefits, you should apply for your Disability Benefits as soon as possible.It is likely in your best interest to do so – both in the short term and long term. Take the time you need to take care of yourself and recuperate. Ignoring your needs is not a good solution. Here at Share Lawyers, we have the experience that can make a difference for you.

Since 1987, Share Lawyers has been committed to protecting the rights of individuals in Ontario and across Canada, handling legal matters in the areas of long-term disability insurance denials and other insurance disputes involving illness, injury or death.

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This searchable database contains information about disability, critical illness and life insurance claims, and what you can do if you are denied or cut off of your benefits. It is a collection of the most common questions we receive from our clients. General answers have been provided by our lawyers.